31 Jul

Charmers Almanac Interview Colleen Hardwick

fvfvfRecently Charmer Almanac invited our CEO, Colleen Hardwick onto their radio show to discuss PlaceSpeak.

The show covers a range of related topics from how PlaceSpeak fits within our democratic system to the use of our new Neighborhoods network for tackling hyper local issues.

 

Listen to the recording here –

 

Charmer Almanac is a morning radio program airing from 7am-10am every other Thursday on CJSW 90.9 FM. Inspired by a curiosity for the people, places and music of Calgary it is hosted by is hosted by Matt Knapik and Kate van Fraassen.

MATTMatt Knapik is a Calgary-based designer, facilitator, and educator. He earned Masters Degrees in Architecture and Urban Design from the University of Calgary, where his research focused on the potential for ecological renovation in suburban neighbourhoods. He is the founder and principal of the design practice kilometre, which is developing thematic specialization in urban landscapes, design facilitation, education, and development. Matt teaches as a sessional instructor in the architecture program in the Faculty of Environmental Design, and co-hosts the radio show Charmer’s Almanac on CJSW.

KateKate van Fraassen graduated from the Faculty of Environmental Design in 2012 with a Masters in Environmental Design. Since February 2012 she has been working as a Development Planner for the Town of Canmore. As part of the awesome Town of Canmore planning team Kate has the pleasure of working on a variety of projects at a range of scales all with the aim to serve Canmore in building an outstanding, innovative and sustainable community. Known as an eternal optimist and an all-round lover of adventure, Kate gets outside as much as she can in between co-hosting Charmer’s Almanac on CJSW 90.9FM.

 

Find us on twitter

https://twitter.com/charmersalmanac

https://twitter.com/placespeak

28 Jul

A CartoDB Timelapse of Our Community Growth

At PlaceSpeak we started doing “civic tech” before we’d even heard the term, but we’ve been glad to discover a civic tech community that’s been around for a while and includes some of the coolest people and companies on the internet. CartoDB is one of the coolest. They want to be the geospatial backbone of the civic tech renaissance, providing GIS data storage and visualization options in a few clicks that would have taken an office full of people just a few years ago. We’re fans and were excited when they asked if we wanted to work together on data visualization.

The project we picked first was a timelapse map of our user growth over the last three and a half years. We’ve had an internal version of this map that we’ve been using for a while, but it’s missing some features and was… less beautiful than it could be. Here’s what CartoDB civic technologist Santiago Giraldo Anduaga put together:

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21 Jul

Customer Success: The City of Fort St. John

fsjMany cities and organizations aim to build true engagement with their citizens by consulting on a regular basis and on a variety of topics. Fort St. John in British Columbia is a great example of a city that has experienced success by embracing ongoing online community engagement after seeing positive uptake from their initial consultations (and even an award).

As a PlaceSpeak Enterprise customer they host multiple consultations featuring a diverse range of topics such as budgets, transportation, downtown rejuvenation and spray parks. This strategy has provided several key advantages. When someone connects with one consultation they are notified of others in the area leading to more high quality engagement upon which to base their decision making.

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17 Jul

Webinar Recording: 5 Key Trends Shaping Online Citizen Engagement

PlaceSpeak reveals five key trends that are shaping citizen engagement in 2015 in this engaging and thought-provoking webinar. We address trends in Open Data, Open Government, and Citizen Relationship Management. We also explore the idea of the citizen as the canary in the mineshaft, using feedback as a barometer of civic satisfaction, and conclude with a compare and contrast with social media and public participation.

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